buzzfeedgeeky:

Every character from the original Star Wars in one awesome poster. [full image!]

(via faultinourdeathstars)


(via watertribe)


steelandcotton:

“I don’t oppose playing ball in the least, but I do oppose this feverish consumption of foreigners’ goods. This is exercise, but it is the exercise of the gents and ladies of the leisured classes. If you want to exercise your body, is a blade not enough? Is a sword routine not enough? Are wrestling or boxing not enough? Of China’s eighteen types of martial arts, not one is incapable of drenching our entire bodies in sweat, stimulating all the body’s blood, tendons, and bones.”
- Warlord Feng Yuxiang, 1927 (Andrew D. Morris. Marrow of the Nation: A History of Sport and Physical Culture in Republican China. pp. 195-196.)
I am sure I’ve rubbed some the wrong way, when at seminars I said, (teachers in attendance), “You say you are practicing taijiquan, but you are not. You are practicing bits and pieces of the system, not the art.” A big missing piece is the power training. Honestly, how are practitioners to develop internal power without systematic power training? Certainly, pushing on the air while moving thru forms, as important an aspect of training as forms are, does not prove a method for training fajin (releasing power, 發勁). Power training has traditionally been preformed with heavy weapons. I recall a devilishly heavy and flexible hardwood spear at my teacher’s, Wang Yen-nien’s (王延年) school, in Taipei. Not only was it about 4 meters long, the shaft flexed so much with each thrust or coiling movement that it was always a beat behind one’s body action. It fought you every step of the way thru the drills. A few minutes with that beast exhausted the best.
What training with weapons provides is a consistent hard object to release power into. Because the weapon is always the same, unlike pushing a live partner, one can repeat and prefect different types of movements for short energy or long, thrusting or coiling, and so on. Each weapon, the saber (dao, 刀), the sword (jian, 劍), spear (chiang, 槍) and other has its own unique character, each can be used as a tool to develop specific types of jin (勁).
Taijiquan practitioners who desire to go beyond simple exercise and fully realize the art would be wise to follow the entire system Yang Luchan (or other lineage founder) created for us, and not simply practice the parts that are convenient or “easy.”

steelandcotton:

“I don’t oppose playing ball in the least, but I do oppose this feverish consumption of foreigners’ goods. This is exercise, but it is the exercise of the gents and ladies of the leisured classes. If you want to exercise your body, is a blade not enough? Is a sword routine not enough? Are wrestling or boxing not enough? Of China’s eighteen types of martial arts, not one is incapable of drenching our entire bodies in sweat, stimulating all the body’s blood, tendons, and bones.”

- Warlord Feng Yuxiang, 1927
(Andrew D. Morris. Marrow of the Nation: A History of Sport and Physical Culture in Republican China. pp. 195-196.)

I am sure I’ve rubbed some the wrong way, when at seminars I said, (teachers in attendance), “You say you are practicing taijiquan, but you are not. You are practicing bits and pieces of the system, not the art.” A big missing piece is the power training. Honestly, how are practitioners to develop internal power without systematic power training? Certainly, pushing on the air while moving thru forms, as important an aspect of training as forms are, does not prove a method for training fajin (releasing power, 發勁). Power training has traditionally been preformed with heavy weapons. I recall a devilishly heavy and flexible hardwood spear at my teacher’s, Wang Yen-nien’s (王延年) school, in Taipei. Not only was it about 4 meters long, the shaft flexed so much with each thrust or coiling movement that it was always a beat behind one’s body action. It fought you every step of the way thru the drills. A few minutes with that beast exhausted the best.

What training with weapons provides is a consistent hard object to release power into. Because the weapon is always the same, unlike pushing a live partner, one can repeat and prefect different types of movements for short energy or long, thrusting or coiling, and so on. Each weapon, the saber (dao, 刀), the sword (jian, 劍), spear (chiang, 槍) and other has its own unique character, each can be used as a tool to develop specific types of jin (勁).

Taijiquan practitioners who desire to go beyond simple exercise and fully realize the art would be wise to follow the entire system Yang Luchan (or other lineage founder) created for us, and not simply practice the parts that are convenient or “easy.”

(via the-history-of-fighting)


My heart is yours,
It’s you that I hold on to,
That’s what I’ll do
I know I was wrong,
But I won’t let you down

(via theharrypottertexts)


plutoisaplanetdammit:

dwarferinthetardis:

magnus-thegreat-redundancy:

I believe that ever american should at least watch this monologue from The Newsroom

I watched this episode in class for a media class. By the end of this scene, the whole class was cheering.

this isn’t real, america still awesome

(via strikeblr)



pimientos-especiales:

Sorry but like how is no one freaking out about The Sims 4?

LOOK AT IT. LOOK.

THERE AREN’T ANY SLIDERS. YOU CAN ADJUST BODY SHAPE SO YOU COULD HAVE A FAT SIM WITH SKINNY LEGS AND BROAD SHOULDERS. OR A SKINNY SIM WITH A BARREL CHEST AND CHUNKY THIGHS.

SIMS HAVE EMOTIONS AND MEMORIES ACTUALLY AFFECT WHAT YOUR SIMS CAN DO.

AND THEY DON’T LOOK LIKE WEIRD, SHINY, PUDDING PEOPLE.

ALSO JUST LOOK HOW BEAUTIFUL THAT FIRST PICTURE IS. LOOK AT IT.

MY BODY IS READY.

But my wallet is not.

(via fight-0ff-yourdem0ns)



We met when he was 15 and I remember looking at him and thinking he was offensively attractive. And it’s just gotten worse from there.

(via the-absolute-best-posts)